Discussion:
to put sth anywhere u like
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³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-15 16:18:42 UTC
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c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-15 16:22:59 UTC
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to put sth anywhere u like
^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. O.
Same grammar as in
"to put the book on the table"
"To leave the dishes in the kitchen"
"To take the clothes of out the washing machine"
"To buy the video from the store"
"To take my borhter home"
"To drop her off here"
如何解釋文法呢
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³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-15 16:51:42 UTC
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Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
to put sth anywhere u like
^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. O.
Same grammar as in
"to put the book on the table"
"To leave the dishes in the kitchen"
"To take the clothes of out the washing machine"
"To buy the video from the store"
"To take my borhter home"
"To drop her off here"
如何解釋文法呢
Excuse me,I really don't think so.
for one thing, there are basiclly 2 divisions above in that phrase.
one is put sth anywhere; the other is (anywhere) u like
let's take the frist eximination at the first one-- to put sth anywhere.
to put sth anywhere-- it's absolutely no doubt grammatical.
put (incompletely Vt) sth (O) anywhere(Adv)
but look at the 2nd-- (anywhere) u like
that's the wonder-- 1. like is a transitive.
May i say i like anywhere in a dependent sentence without in a context?
or what i mean is that have u ever seen the syntax as follows.

S like O anywhere
Obviously, if u wanna put the 2 into 1, u need a relative pronoun,and
the Q at the same time emerges.

u can say i read sth (which, that) u like.
or even u can say i can put an apple anywhere.
but can u say i can put an apple anywhere i like?
or i can put an apple where i like?
where , as a relative pronoun , is followed by a complete sentence-
S V in a sentence.
For example, It's (the place) where i live.
Getting rid of the semantic and logic technical problems,can you please
analyze and explain, if grammatical, "i can put an apple (any)where i like"
I hope someone can understand me.
thanks a lot.





--

不以物喜,不以己悲
~共勉之

文人相輕,冤冤相報何時了
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³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-15 17:09:11 UTC
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※ 引述《freshlove (被英文判了無期徒刑>_<)》之銘言:
Post by ³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. O.
Same grammar as in
"to put the book on the table"
"To leave the dishes in the kitchen"
"To take the clothes of out the washing machine"
"To buy the video from the store"
"To take my borhter home"
"To drop her off here"
Excuse me,I really don't think so.
for one thing, there are basiclly 2 divisions above in that phrase.
one is put sth anywhere; the other is (anywhere) u like
let's take the frist eximination at the first one-- to put sth anywhere.
to put sth anywhere-- it's absolutely no doubt grammatical.
put (incompletely Vt) sth (O) anywhere(Adv)
but look at the 2nd-- (anywhere) u like
that's the wonder-- 1. like is a transitive.
May i say i like anywhere in a dependent sentence without in a context?
or what i mean is that have u ever seen the syntax as follows.
S like O anywhere
Obviously, if u wanna put the 2 into 1, u need a relative pronoun,and
the Q at the same time emerges.
u can say i read sth (which, that) u like.
or even u can say i can put an apple anywhere.
but can u say i can put an apple anywhere i like?
or i can put an apple where i like?
where , as a relative pronoun , is followed by a complete sentence-
S V in a sentence.
For example, It's (the place) where i live.
Getting rid of the semantic and logic technical problems,can you please
analyze and explain, if grammatical, "i can put an apple (any)where i like"
I hope someone can understand me.
thanks a lot.
source:空英4/15,2nd part(break之後的6:58處)
p.s.希望我沒聽錯 (... put it where everyone can enjoy it.)
also, 應該更不可能用 N Clause解吧
thanks in advance.


--

不以物喜,不以己悲
~共勉之

文人相輕,冤冤相報何時了
--
┌─────◆KKCITY◆─────┐ ◢ ◤  ★ 線上音樂新震撼 ★ ◢ ◤
│ bbs.kkcity.com.tw │ ^_^ /  隨選隨播免等待  KKBOX◤  ^_^ / 
└──《From:61.59.180.42 》──┘    ◤ http://www.kkbox.com.tw   ◤
c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-15 17:52:27 UTC
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Now I see your question. This is how I view it:
To put something anywhere (that) you like.

You cannot say "I like anywhere", but rather "I like" describes and
specify in the rage of "anywhere", as in:
the store I like (there are many stores),
the movie he watched (there's only one out of the movies currently on),
the car she drove in (it can only be 1 car),
the colors my sister likes (out of many available ones).

"To put something anywhere you like." is to say "put something anywhere"
yet defining by "you like".

e.g. (a complete sentence) or (the same type as your example)
The store I like was closed yesterday. or, To go to the store I like.
The movie he watched was very violent. or, To avoid the movie he watched.
The car she drove in had to be serviced. or To look at the car she drove in.
The colors my sister likes are all dark. or TO pick out the colors she likes.
Post by ³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
Excuse me,I really don't think so.
for one thing, there are basiclly 2 divisions above in that phrase.
one is put sth anywhere; the other is (anywhere) u like
let's take the frist eximination at the first one-- to put sth anywhere.
to put sth anywhere-- it's absolutely no doubt grammatical.
put (incompletely Vt) sth (O) anywhere(Adv)
but look at the 2nd-- (anywhere) u like
that's the wonder-- 1. like is a transitive.
May i say i like anywhere in a dependent sentence without in a context?
or what i mean is that have u ever seen the syntax as follows.
S like O anywhere
Obviously, if u wanna put the 2 into 1, u need a relative pronoun,and
the Q at the same time emerges.
u can say i read sth (which, that) u like.
or even u can say i can put an apple anywhere.
but can u say i can put an apple anywhere i like?
or i can put an apple where i like?
where , as a relative pronoun , is followed by a complete sentence-
S V in a sentence.
For example, It's (the place) where i live.
Getting rid of the semantic and logic technical problems,can you please
analyze and explain, if grammatical, "i can put an apple (any)where i like"
I hope someone can understand me.
thanks a lot.
--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-15 17:54:40 UTC
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Post by ³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
source:空英4/15,2nd part(break之後的6:58處)
p.s.希望我沒聽錯 (... put it where everyone can enjoy it.)
also, 應該更不可能用 N Clause解吧
thanks in advance.
Sorry I don't understand your question here.
--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-15 18:43:53 UTC
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※ 引述《***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw》之銘言:


Thanks for reading with patience and answering my Q.
Never have i doubted that the syntax u provide below-- The store
I like was closed yesterday, etc. is grammatical;nor have u.
but u kicked around the wrong point.
U know, The store I like was closed yesterday (A) is different in sentence
structure/syntax from put sth anywhere I like(B).
In both above sentences, u can easiy distinguish one from the other in
the 2, for in A "store" is a noun, which is paired with like(Vt).
However, in B, (any)where is not a noun, not to speak of being matched by
like (Vt)
we understand an intransitive can be modified by an adverb like "run fast"
, instead of fix(Vt) well.
As a matter of fact, what i doubt is that were this sentence a relative
pronoun sentence, we'd need a noun put before whatever relative pronouns
followed by S "Vt". e.g. the book which I bought yesterday, instead of
put sth where i like
all in all, how do u define the term-where (a noun? an adverb? or whatever
it can be? )?
thanks a lot.
Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
To put something anywhere (that) you like.
You cannot say "I like anywhere", but rather "I like" describes and
the store I like (there are many stores),
the movie he watched (there's only one out of the movies currently on),
the car she drove in (it can only be 1 car),
the colors my sister likes (out of many available ones).
"To put something anywhere you like." is to say "put something anywhere"
yet defining by "you like".
e.g. (a complete sentence) or (the same type as your example)
The store I like was closed yesterday. or, To go to the store I like.
The movie he watched was very violent. or, To avoid the movie he watched.
The car she drove in had to be serviced. or To look at the car she drove in.
The colors my sister likes are all dark. or TO pick out the colors she likes.
Post by ³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
Excuse me,I really don't think so.
for one thing, there are basiclly 2 divisions above in that phrase.
one is put sth anywhere; the other is (anywhere) u like
let's take the frist eximination at the first one-- to put sth anywhere.
to put sth anywhere-- it's absolutely no doubt grammatical.
put (incompletely Vt) sth (O) anywhere(Adv)
but look at the 2nd-- (anywhere) u like
that's the wonder-- 1. like is a transitive.
May i say i like anywhere in a dependent sentence without in a context?
or what i mean is that have u ever seen the syntax as follows.
S like O anywhere
Obviously, if u wanna put the 2 into 1, u need a relative pronoun,and
the Q at the same time emerges.
u can say i read sth (which, that) u like.
or even u can say i can put an apple anywhere.
but can u say i can put an apple anywhere i like?
or i can put an apple where i like?
where , as a relative pronoun , is followed by a complete sentence-
S V in a sentence.
For example, It's (the place) where i live.
Getting rid of the semantic and logic technical problems,can you please
analyze and explain, if grammatical, "i can put an apple (any)where i like"
I hope someone can understand me.
thanks a lot.
--

不以物喜,不以己悲
~共勉之

文人相輕,冤冤相報何時了
--
┌─────◆KKCITY◆─────┐ ◢ ◤  ★ 線上音樂新震撼 ★ ◢ ◤
│ bbs.kkcity.com.tw │ ^_^ /  隨選隨播免等待  KKBOX◤  ^_^ / 
└──《From:61.59.180.42 》──┘    ◤ http://www.kkbox.com.tw   ◤
c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-15 19:43:17 UTC
Permalink
Let's see if we have better luck this time communicating. ;)

anywhre:
[adverb] in, at or to any place or point
[noun] any place

To put something anywhere you like.
= To put something at any place you like.

Now, do we agree that the "place" in "any place" gives a noun? And
"anywhere" is classified as an adverb because it incorporates the
perp. in front (in, at, to)?

So the structure is the same as "The store I like was closed yesterday"
in which "the store" is a noun.

Or, comparing:
"They took me to a store they like." and "They took me to a place they like."

You might have misunderstood that an adverb always describes a verb (like
in your examples of "run fast"), while here, the adverb describes a place.

The definition of an "adverbial":
"A word of phrase which gives information about when, how, where or in what
circumstances something happens. An adverbial can be an adverb, a group of
words whose main word is an adverb, or a prepositional phrase.."

In this case, the adverb "anywhere" gives information about "where" and
is the combination of "prep. + noun".

To put something anywhere you like.
^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. O. location
(c.f. to put your pen on the table)

Hope this helps a bit more?
Post by ³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
Thanks for reading with patience and answering my Q.
Never have i doubted that the syntax u provide below-- The store
I like was closed yesterday, etc. is grammatical;nor have u.
but u kicked around the wrong point.
U know, The store I like was closed yesterday (A) is different in sentence
structure/syntax from put sth anywhere I like(B).
In both above sentences, u can easiy distinguish one from the other in
the 2, for in A "store" is a noun, which is paired with like(Vt).
However, in B, (any)where is not a noun, not to speak of being matched by
like (Vt)
we understand an intransitive can be modified by an adverb like "run fast"
, instead of fix(Vt) well.
As a matter of fact, what i doubt is that were this sentence a relative
pronoun sentence, we'd need a noun put before whatever relative pronouns
followed by S "Vt". e.g. the book which I bought yesterday, instead of
put sth where i like
all in all, how do u define the term-where (a noun? an adverb? or whatever
it can be? )?
thanks a lot.
--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-15 19:49:11 UTC
Permalink
With

added

material

in

my

text

..
Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
Let's see if we have better luck this time communicating. ;)
[adverb] in, at or to any place or point
[noun] any place
To put something anywhere you like.
= To put something at any place you like.
Now, do we agree that the "place" in "any place" gives a noun? And
"anywhere" is classified as an adverb because it incorporates the
perp. in front (in, at, to)?
So the structure is the same as "The store I like was closed yesterday"
in which "the store" is a noun.
"They took me to a store they like.",
"They took me to a place they like."
"They could take me to any place they like."
"They could take me anywhere they like." (remember "anywhere"="to any place")
You might have misunderstood that an adverb always describes a verb (like
in your examples of "run fast"), while here, the adverb describes a place.
"A word of phrase which gives information about when, how, where or in what
circumstances something happens. An adverbial can be an adverb, a group of
words whose main word is an adverb, or a prepositional phrase.."
In this case, the adverb "anywhere" gives information about "where" and
is the combination of "prep. + noun".
To put something anywhere you like.
^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. O. location
(c.f. to put your pen on the table)
Hope this helps a bit more?
--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-16 03:14:24 UTC
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c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-16 10:53:37 UTC
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I'm getting confused with your posts. To answer your questions straight:
1. No, because "where" here is not a noun (hence not a relative pronoun),
but a conjunction equal to "in the place that", a combination of the structure
"pre. + noun + clause".
Relative pronouns in relative cluases are "that, who, which and whom" only,
being "nouns" themselves. e.g.
She's just a girl that/who wanted to grow up happily.
I bought a car that/which came with a three-year warranty.
That's the guy whom your brother gave some money to.
2. I see it as a defining relative clause, giving more information on the
location. To make it a relative pronoun clause, the sentence needs to be in
the form of: "I saw a car in the place that/which I like reading in.", where
"that/which" are relative pronouns. It stays a relative pronoun clause when
"that/which" is omitted to give "I saw a car in the place I like reading in."
3. Put something anywhere you like.
= Put something in any place (that) you like.

Now the same questions on the original - "Put something anywhere you like":
1. "Anywhere" is an adverb or a noun, not a pronoun. (Indefinite pronouns
give information without indicating exactly who and what the particular noun
is, including "anybody, anyone, anything, nobody, no-one, nothing, somebody,
someone, something". e.g.
Did anybody come in to see me this morning?
Just give these cookies to anyone.
Nothing was done about his heart condition.)

But we can view the sentence "Put something anywhere you like."
= Put something anywhere (that/which) you like.
= Put something in any place (that/which) you like.
With "that" in position, the relative pronoun clause becomes clear here.
2. To me here "anywhere" is an adverb = "in any place", the location
information is specified by "you like".

I note you replaced "anywhere" with "wherever" in your last paragraph.
Note the different between the two: "anywhere" is an adverb in most cases
whereas "wherever" is an adverb and a conjunction, also different in meaning.
"Anywhere" and "everywhere" are not always interchangeable in all situations, and assuming so automatically
may cause further confusion.

The last two example of yours:
Put something wherever you like.
= Put something in any of every place (that) you like.
(Relative pronoun clause in place.)

Somebody's parents can make their offsprings "with" whomever they want.
= ...can make their offsprings with any person whom they want.
With "whomever" being a pronoun, the above contains a pronoun clause.
Again and again, i am genuine that thank you cos you have taken great
pains to explain it.
However, there must be something amiss between our grammatical understanding.
What about these 2.
I saw a car where a man was killed.
and
I saw a car where i like reading.
1=I saw a car which a man was killed in.
=I saw a car in whcih a man was killed.
=I saw a car where a man was killed.
2=I saw a car which i like reading in.
=I saw a car in which i like reading.
=I saw a car where i like reading.
ok,let me ask you straight some Qs.
1. do u think of where in this case as a relative pronoun?
2. if not, what do u think where is?
in fact, judging from its syntatic structure, i am sure it's under relative
pronoun construction, isn't it?
3. can u return put sth (any)where sb like to the original condition
as i, please?
finally, if u agree that it's a relative pronoun sentence,too, then the
following will best apply to the rule.
to put sth wherever sb like just as sb's parents can make their offspring
whomever they want.
Thanks, anyway.
Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
Let's see if we have better luck this time communicating. ;)
[adverb] in, at or to any place or point
[noun] any place
To put something anywhere you like.
= To put something at any place you like.
Now, do we agree that the "place" in "any place" gives a noun? And
"anywhere" is classified as an adverb because it incorporates the
perp. in front (in, at, to)?
So the structure is the same as "The store I like was closed yesterday"
in which "the store" is a noun.
"They took me to a store they like." and "They took me to a place they like."
You might have misunderstood that an adverb always describes a verb (like
in your examples of "run fast"), while here, the adverb describes a place.
"A word of phrase which gives information about when, how, where or in what
circumstances something happens. An adverbial can be an adverb, a group of
words whose main word is an adverb, or a prepositional phrase.."
In this case, the adverb "anywhere" gives information about "where" and
is the combination of "prep. + noun".
To put something anywhere you like.
^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. O. location
(c.f. to put your pen on the table)
Hope this helps a bit more?
--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-16 11:34:17 UTC
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c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-16 14:45:01 UTC
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Since u say anwhere is an adverb; ok,here I am wondering that what
can precede relative pronouns? can adverbs be followed by relative pronouns?
anywhere, as an adverb like u say, isn't equal to in any place, in my view.
place is a noun, while anywhere is an adverb.
"Anywhere" (adverb) = "in any place" (preposition + noun)
"Anywhere" is a combination of a prep. and a noun, which is
classified as an adverb
("1" = "2+3", so 1 is neither 2 nor 3 independently, or
"the class" = "1 teacher" + "30 students", so only "1 teacher" or
"30 students" on its own doesn't constitute "the class")
Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
With "whomever" being a pronoun, the above contains a pronoun clause.
well, excuse me, i really don't know what the structure-- make sb with...
means.
in my sentence, make is used as the 4th.
1. I am making coffee right now.
2. I will make a lawyer some day.
3. I will make/have her do her homework.
4. Skipping class makes him a traunt.
Ok here I misunderstood your previous sentence. You said:
"Somebody's parents can make their offspring whomever they want."
This is incorrect itself as "whomever" need to be replaced with
"whatever" (referring to an occupation). This again, can be rephrased to:
"Somebody's parents can make their offspring whatever (occupation)
(that/which) they want." - a relative pronoun clause.

It might help if we go back to basic: adverbs are single-worded adverbials,
and by definition an adverbial is a word or phrase that "acts as as a modifier
of a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a preposition, a phrase, a clause,
or a sentence, expressing some relation of manner or quality, place, time,
degree, number, cause, opposition, affirmation, or denial, and in English
also serving to connect and to express comment on clause content".

Adverbials of place (shown in [] below) are used to give information
on location:
A plane flew [overhead].
The children were playing [in the park].
The waiter [behind the girl] collapsed.

You would agree it is grammartically correct if some of these are followed
by a relative pronoun, e.g.
The children were playing [in the park] that/which was re-opened last week.
The waiter [behind the girl] that/who ordered wine collapsed.

A relative pronoun cannot follow "overhead" but it is possible with other
adverbs, e.g.
Indoors, adverb, = in a bulding
Playing this game indoors that has air-conditioning is much more pleasant.
Downstairs, adverb, = down the stairs
She heard a sound from downstairs that was empty at the time.
Outside, adverb, = on or to the outside
Cars shouldn't be parked outside which doesn't have any security measures.
Last of all, all i meant is that in to put sth (any)where sb likes is
ungratmmatical.
1. if (any)where is an adverb, I never see adverbs can percede relative
nouns.
1. In the case "anywhere" is an adverb, please see examples above in addition
to the original sentence in discussion: "Put something anywhere you like".

Remember here your "adverb" is composed by "prep." + "noun", so effectively
the relative noun follows a "noun" ("place" in this case")

"Put something anywhere (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun adv. clause
= "Put something in any place (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun prep. noun clause

Compare this to:
"Wear something in any color you like.",
"Read something from any period you choose."
"Write something on any paper you."

Just for fun, if adverbs have evolved for ["prep." + "any noun"] in the above
examples, they may look like:
"Wear something [anycolor] you like."
"Read something [anyage] you like."
"Write something [anycloth] you like."
2. if it is a noun, then,never have i seen to put sth N sb likes.
for example, have u ever seen put an apple floor?
or put an apple floor u like?
2. "Anywhere" is not a noun in this sentence, and your example is incorrect and
therefore not comparable. The grammartically correct sentence is:
"Put the apple ON the floor (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun prep. noun clause
(if there are many floors you can put the apple on.)
or, again,
"Put the apple IN THE CORNER (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun prep. noun clause

Now you can compare this with
"Put something in any place (that/which) you like."
= "Put something anywhere you like."



Having said all these, I have just realized that Collinds Cobuild English
Usage under "Places" writes:
"There are four indefinite adverbs of position and direction:
abtwgere, everywhere, nowhere and somewhere."
"You can also put a relative clause after these adverbs. Note that you do
not usually use a relative pronoun.", e.g.:
I could go anywhere I wanted.
Everywhere I went, people were angry or suspicious.
thanks a lot.
希望這clarity不會被當成笑話
I don't think it's anything to be laughed at for. I just hope my explanation
is of some help and that we can sort out this confusion eventually.

--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
2004-04-16 15:53:27 UTC
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Thank you , chica. you're really one in a million.
your explanation is surely of great help.
In the long run, I've understood you.
well, guess what?
Every grammar book I have on hand doesn't have sample sentences for
structure of this--- XXXX adv (that,which,who, whom) S V XXX.
Lastly,my opinion is that neither you nor I am wrong.
Now i'll keep in mind that an uncommon usage like put sth anywhere sb likes
exists.
Thanks a lot.
Post by c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
Since u say anwhere is an adverb; ok,here I am wondering that what
can precede relative pronouns? can adverbs be followed by relative pronouns?
anywhere, as an adverb like u say, isn't equal to in any place, in my view.
place is a noun, while anywhere is an adverb.
"Anywhere" (adverb) = "in any place" (preposition + noun)
"Anywhere" is a combination of a prep. and a noun, which is
classified as an adverb
("1" = "2+3", so 1 is neither 2 nor 3 independently, or
"the class" = "1 teacher" + "30 students", so only "1 teacher" or
"30 students" on its own doesn't constitute "the class")
well, excuse me, i really don't know what the structure-- make sb with...
means.
in my sentence, make is used as the 4th.
1. I am making coffee right now.
2. I will make a lawyer some day.
3. I will make/have her do her homework.
4. Skipping class makes him a traunt.
"Somebody's parents can make their offspring whomever they want."
This is incorrect itself as "whomever" need to be replaced with
"Somebody's parents can make their offspring whatever (occupation)
(that/which) they want." - a relative pronoun clause.
It might help if we go back to basic: adverbs are single-worded adverbials,
and by definition an adverbial is a word or phrase that "acts as as a modifier
of a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a preposition, a phrase, a clause,
or a sentence, expressing some relation of manner or quality, place, time,
degree, number, cause, opposition, affirmation, or denial, and in English
also serving to connect and to express comment on clause content".
Adverbials of place (shown in [] below) are used to give information
A plane flew [overhead].
The children were playing [in the park].
The waiter [behind the girl] collapsed.
You would agree it is grammartically correct if some of these are followed
by a relative pronoun, e.g.
The children were playing [in the park] that/which was re-opened last week.
The waiter [behind the girl] that/who ordered wine collapsed.
A relative pronoun cannot follow "overhead" but it is possible with other
adverbs, e.g.
Indoors, adverb, = in a bulding
Playing this game indoors that has air-conditioning is much more pleasant.
Downstairs, adverb, = down the stairs
She heard a sound from downstairs that was empty at the time.
Outside, adverb, = on or to the outside
Cars shouldn't be parked outside which doesn't have any security measures.
Last of all, all i meant is that in to put sth (any)where sb likes is
ungratmmatical.
1. if (any)where is an adverb, I never see adverbs can percede relative
nouns.
1. In the case "anywhere" is an adverb, please see examples above in addition
to the original sentence in discussion: "Put something anywhere you like".
Remember here your "adverb" is composed by "prep." + "noun", so effectively
the relative noun follows a "noun" ("place" in this case")
"Put something anywhere (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun adv. clause
= "Put something in any place (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun prep. noun clause
"Wear something in any color you like.",
"Read something from any period you choose."
"Write something on any paper you."
Just for fun, if adverbs have evolved for ["prep." + "any noun"] in the above
"Wear something [anycolor] you like."
"Read something [anyage] you like."
"Write something [anycloth] you like."
2. if it is a noun, then,never have i seen to put sth N sb likes.
for example, have u ever seen put an apple floor?
or put an apple floor u like?
2. "Anywhere" is not a noun in this sentence, and your example is incorrect and
"Put the apple ON the floor (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun prep. noun clause
(if there are many floors you can put the apple on.)
or, again,
"Put the apple IN THE CORNER (that/which) you like."
^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
V. noun prep. noun clause
Now you can compare this with
"Put something in any place (that/which) you like."
= "Put something anywhere you like."
Having said all these, I have just realized that Collinds Cobuild English
abtwgere, everywhere, nowhere and somewhere."
"You can also put a relative clause after these adverbs. Note that you do
I could go anywhere I wanted.
Everywhere I went, people were angry or suspicious.
thanks a lot.
希望這clarity不會被當成笑話
I don't think it's anything to be laughed at for. I just hope my explanation
is of some help and that we can sort out this confusion eventually.
--

不以物喜,不以己悲
~共勉之

文人相輕,冤冤相報何時了
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c***@bbs.ntu.edu.tw
2004-04-16 20:04:28 UTC
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You are welcome! I am very pleased, after all the typing! ;)

Communication limited to written words only probably made it harder to
understand each other.

Some language usages have no definite right or wrong; they are
the result of costumary practice by evolution and continue to
change with time, which is why tool books like dictionaries and
grammar books are updated and modified reguarly.

This has provided an excellent opportunity for me to learn and organize
my thoughts. So I guess at least we both, if no-one else, have benefited
from this string.
Post by ³Q­^€å§P€FµLŽÁ®{ŠD>_<
Thank you , chica. you're really one in a million.
your explanation is surely of great help.
In the long run, I've understood you.
well, guess what?
Every grammar book I have on hand doesn't have sample sentences for
structure of this--- XXXX adv (that,which,who, whom) S V XXX.
Lastly,my opinion is that neither you nor I am wrong.
Now i'll keep in mind that an uncommon usage like put sth anywhere sb likes
exists.
Thanks a lot.
--
☆ [Origin:椰林風情] [From: cpc3-cmbg2-5-0-cust191.cmbg] [Login: **] [Post: **]
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